Saturday, June 10, 2017

Groove-billed Anis, unusual looking southern Texas specialty

 I spotted this ani at Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge as it was drinking water at the edge of North Lake. I came around a corner and it was only 10 feet in front of me but it quickly flew into the thick vegetation. After vocalizing it flew up into a tree where I got the top 2 pics.

 I saw my first Groove-billed Anis in Costa some years ago but an experience that is still clear in my memory.  As I was wandering alone around the town of Monteverde so it was my own discovery not just a bird pointed out to me by a guide.
I heard a second ani vocalize in the vegetation near the tree and the first ani flew in there providing me with the above photo.  Unfortunately the thick vegetation made getting a focused photo not possible but it was too neat to get 2 anis together to not include this pic. 
 The next day I returned to Santa Ana which was having Family Days with a number of activities including the opportunity to kayak on North Lake which I took advantage of.  As I rowed the kayak slowly around the lake I got the bottom 3 photos of one or more anis in the trees on the banks of the lake. 
 One interesting tidbit, this species is communal in it's breeding.  These anis " lives in small groups of one to five breeding pairs. They defend a single territory and lay their eggs in one communal nest. All group members incubate the eggs and care for the young." (from AllAboutBirds.orghttps://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Groove-billed_Ani/lifehistory)  SeEtta

Thursday, June 8, 2017

My bird photo displayed in the Witte Museum in San Antonio and pics of other parts of the exhibit

I am so very thrilled to post about that my photo just above is displayed in the Texas Wild Exhibit which is a permanent exhibit in the Witte Museum in San Antonio, TX. This is the only photo I have ever sold and the only time I have asked to submit some photos for consideration for display in a museum. I visited the Witte Museum for the first time this week and took these cell phone photos of my photo above and in the Rio Grande Valley display below as well as a number of other displays in the Texas Wild Exhibit.  I was delighted to get to meet Helen Holdsworth, the Curator of Texas Wild, who follows this blog.

Above is a taxidermied ocelot, an Endangered species found in the Rio Grande Valley in small numbers.
Above is a Harris' Hawk, coyote and Northern Bobwhite.

The pic above was taken from the second floor of the museum which has a large opening to the floor below.
Starting above with the Crested Caracara and pics in section below are from South Texas Thornbrush.

The pic above shows how they blend the reality into their displays with a den in the side of this display holding a snake.

The pic above is from a Gulf of Mexico display

The pic above is from the canyon country of Texas.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Wood Thrush pics and video of it bathing vigorously


Wood Thrush bathing on South Padre Island,TX from SeEtta Moss on Vimeo.
This Wood Thrush is vigorously bathing in the video above, much deserved after flying hundreds of miles over the Gulf of Mexico. 
 It is wonderful that local birders have provided this important migration stop over on South Padre Island in cooperation with the adjacent Convention Center that allows the plantings and the water feature to provide for tired, hungry and thirsty neotropical migrant birds like this.


Monday, June 5, 2017

Young Painted Bunting

I photographed this young Painted Bunting on South Padre Island in early May when a lot of neotropical migrants were stopping over so I couldn't keep up with them all. 
I believe this is an immature male as in addition to the greenish upperparts there is almost reddish feathering on it's underparts.
Like a number of songbirds it waited for other birds, especially big ole grackles, to get out of the water before it entered.  It finally go in but it was in a location that I couldn't get pics.SeEtta